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SDHSA

Northeast Sector: Formally SDHSA (Stittsville and Dwyer Hill Snowmobile Association)


Welcome to the 2016 sledding season!

Contact:

General Stittsville/Munster/Ashton area snowmobiling email contact:  sdhsa_general@yahoo.ca

Operations

It is business as usual. We need crews to get out to address any problem areas, brush hanging limbs, remove numerous windfalls, install gates and start signage before the hunters make use of their land.  As always, we would really appreciate a helping hand in these activities.  Stittsville area has a yearly membership of well over 200 permits, yet the names you see below and at the page bottom perform 99% of the work to keep the system up and running, year after year. Please contact us via the email address above if you can help in any manner.

 

Stittsville/Northeast Representatives for current season:

The following individuals will play the roles below in upcoming season on behalf of the Stittsville area at monthly BEAST meetings. The SDHSA does not have official OFSC club status any longer, as we are one of four(Ashton north and south, Richmond and Stittsville) parts of the BEAST.  There have been no significant changes from the past season.

 

Trail setup crew Numerous volunteers
Darrell Drew Landowner Liaison, Trail Permit Coordinator
Daryl Rauhala Beast NE Director,  NE Operations and Signage Coordinator, City contract rep.

Groomer situation:

 

In the summer of 2008, the BEAST traded in the 1999 New Holland 8160 in partial exchange for two, low hour 2001 BR 180s from The Shop Industrial near Sudbury.  Expect to see one of these BRs in the Stittsville, Munster and Almonte areas the majority of the time. The BEAST now has three BR 180s in the grooming fleet, along with a new,  2012 demo model 1200 GS from UTV Industries in Montreal, based in the SE(Richmond) BEAST sector for floating over swampland.

2016 may be the last year with this setup, as the OFSC has asked the BEAST to remove one groomer from the fleet of 4. This is a province wide program to have newer groomers, but fewer in numbers to lower costs.

 

A Trail Culvert Bridge Project:

The grooming arrangement is largely the same as in past years, although an effort was made in the fall of 2008 by the club to create a temporary bridge on the southern section of the A trail. This was done with OFSC grant money, (and of course many volunteer hours) to both extend grooming range and provide a safer crossing for sledders.  Extended grooming range comes in very handy when there is an equipment breakdown, and grooming units must be shared between various regions.

This project was completed in December 2008, and has undergone a few tweaks( 4 more larger culverts in the middle )  for 2010.  Overall it worked great and kept the full A Trail in the BEAST domain groomed two to three times per week. The A trail moved away from this crossing in 2014 as winter wheat drive trail location.

For 2015, the winter wheat has moved the A trail back over the Jock river crossing from the 2008 project.

For 2016 we are back to the Bleeks Rd crossing of the Jock. Some of the culverts have been re-deployed to the A trail on the route to Almonte.

 

Hwy 7 Four-laning and Continuing Sled Trail Impacts:

 

Open: The BEAST 201 Trail along side Hazeldean Road was shortened and re-routed, but did reopen for the 2007-2008 season and will remain open for the foreseeable future.

After a full year of investigation in 2007, there is a trail from Hazeldean Road to the TCT/BEAST 202. This allows for direct OFSC trail access to the sledders in the West Ridge/Timbermere area.
This is a shortened version of the original BEAST 201 that used to parallel Hwy 7. The trail travels south near the Permacon Plant, and T’s the TCT/BEAST 202 where the Trans Canada Pipeline crosses the TCT.

 

Closed in 2009: The old E103 (renamed 304 north in 2007) from TCT/Dwyer Hill Rd. to March Rd near Almonte is closed for good(and has been since 2009).  There were a couple of factors behind this decision. 

A: the club lost landowner access near the hydro hill during the summer of 2007.

B: West Carleton did not groom the west side of March Road in 2008, making the 304 a bit of a dead end.

C: The 4 lane work at Dwyer Hill Rd and Hwy 7 is a construction zone to avoid, and will be a non sled friendly bridge once complete.

The alternative route to Almonte is the main A Trail that T’s off the TCT closer to Carleton Place.

OpenHwy 7 underpass @ the TCT/A Trail crossing.

Closed in 2011: BEAST 304 near Carleton Place that connects the 202 and E104A and crosses Hwy 7. The Hwy 7 four lane work closed this trail in the 2011 time frame, as the province wanted $2 Million for a sled over/underpass

Volunteers

For others who are interested in some outside exercise and fresh air, we can always use a hand. The club has all the required chainsaws, brushers, tree limers, fuel, etc. If you don’t feel comfortable using this equipment, you certainly can still help, as people are required to clear the bush once it is down. Picket and signage installation is another large task. We generally meet Saturday or Sunday throughout the fall months at about 9am, and work on the trails until around 1 pm (or whatever works for you). There are also the formal BEAST workdays planned as outlined on the main homepage/calendar in late November.

 

Club History

After 32 years of incorporation, SDHSA made the next step in fulfilling the commitment of joining the BEAST, by not renewing our not-for-profit incorporation status for 2008.  This means that SDHSA does not have official club status at the OFSC level, but  continues to operate under a sector/division of the BEAST association of clubs, and enjoys all the benefits provided by the OFSC.

 

Reducing the overhead of operating as a separate club allows the past SDHSA executive to put their full effort into the continued growth of the BEAST. The eventual folding of all three clubs that together make up the BEAST was the original vision when the BEAST was first formed. The SDHSA was the first club in the BEAST to move toward this direction, and the other clubs have followed this model over time.

The SDHSA has had a great run. The club received honour at the Annual General Meeting of the OFSC in September 2007, for being part of the OFSC for 25 years. The time had come to make the next step and move into a more efficient mode of operation to maximize the trail potential.